UCWbLing

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Announcing Global Voices June 12, 2012

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Narratives, photographs, reflections, research…Global Voices has it all!  Click here to access this years issue and to enjoy the work of DePaul University’s talented multilingual community.

Global Voices is an annual e-magazine published by the Collaborative for Multilingual Writing and Research, which seeks to showcase cultural and linguistic diversity.

Look for a new issue each spring and contact us at cmwr@depaul.edu if you would like to submit your work to next years edition.

 

A Conversation about Discrimination in Tutorials: After the Inservice May 16, 2012


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This past Friday Elise N. and I hosted the last inservice of the 2011-2012 academic year, “A Conversation about Discrimination in Tutorials.” Our overall goal was to encourage conversation about our experiences with encountering discriminatory language and attitudes in tutorials, and we were very pleased with the amount of extensive conversation that arose. That said, both Elise and I knew that we would not be able to cover all the territory surrounding  discriminatory language/attitudes in tutorials within the hour and a half time limit, and we hope that this inservice sparks further conversation. A series of quotes, questions, readings, and “Looking back; Looking Forward” next steps are available for you to look over in the prezi Elise and I created. The next steps, which were collectively compiled by the inservice participants, were:

  • keep doin’ what you’re doin’!
  • consider our policies
  • flexibility
  • talk & respect (like we do)
  • consider applying same strategies to these instances of discriminatory language
  • continue our conversation

I’ve also included parts of our prezi in the slideshow above. Check it out! Tell us what you think! Keep the conversation going!

A Conversation about Discrimination in Tutorials on Prezi

 

Towards a Linguistic “Glocalization”: A Geographic Approach to Writing Center Theory. April 5, 2012

In 1997, geographer Erik Swyngedouw challenged the way that scholars viewed globalization with the publication of “Neither Global nor Local: ‘Glocalization’ and the Politics of Scale.” The idea of the “glocal” continues to impact geographers’ perceptions of how scale operates, but how might this phenomena, which acknowledges the way that local and global landscapes impact and inform one another, help shape Peer Writing Tutors’ perceptions of global and local writing elements? I facilitated an interactive Round Robin Session at this years Chicagoland Writing Centers Association’s “Winter Gathering” conference to explore how we as Peer Writing Tutors might glocalize our approach to language, and the responses I received from the session were phenomenal! (more…)

 

Conferences and the Writing Process February 4, 2012

Recently, I finally pushed past my fear of making purchases greater than a month’s rent and registered for this year’s Association of American Geographers (AAG) conference in New York. As a broke student, it’s often hard to justify expenses that rival my quarterly tuition bill, so I sought out the advice of my peers in the Writing Center to help me decide whether or not to go to NYC for AAG. At first, I expected my fellow students to encourage me to play it safe: Why spend so much money on a trip that will cost you a week’s pay and yield no more than a canvas tote bag and a pen? It’s simply not economic. However, to my surprise and ultimate delight, the encouragement of my peers forced me to reflect on my previous conference experiences and I eventually came to terms with the fantastic reality: conferences are where it’s at! (more…)

 

Learn Something New Right Now and It Won’t Cost A Cent January 17, 2012

Another day, another free source of information on the Internet!  This one’s particularly cool, though; now art students and enthusiasts of all stripes can access the Guggenheim Museum New York’s old exhibition catalogs as free e-books, dating all the way back to 1937.  It’s just one more step in the democratization of academic and cultural information, and it’s great for readers and writers. (more…)

 

Research Team In-Service September 24, 2011

Attention, UCWbLers!

Research Team here! Have you ever wanted to know how students feel about your work as tutors? Have you ever wondered how many tutorials the Writing Center conducts from year-to-year? Are you curious as to what students have to say about the Writing Center after they leave? Then come to the Research Team’s in-service this Friday, September 30th, at 10:00 am! (more…)

 

A Weekend at the East Central Writing Centers Association Conference March 8, 2011

On this past Friday, I traveled by Amtrak to Kalamazoo, Michigan. It was early in the morning and the landscape was stark and gray, but due to a sense of expectation, I found it difficult to nap. Lisa, a fellow tutor from DePaul’s UCWbL, was with me on the train. We were both members of the Reseach Team and we were going to be presenting at a conference for the East Central Writing Centers Association (ECWCA) in a matter of hours with several other undergraduate and graduate tutors. (more…)

 

Research-Writing Workshops to Come to Suburban Campuses! February 23, 2011

Winter quarter is nearly half done, and I’m sure everyone knows what that means. Mid-terms are over, the snow is starting to melt, and the UCWbL’s winter quarter research-writing workshop is coming to a Suburban Campus near you!

This workshop, “From First Draft to Polished Product: Writing Your Researched Argument,” will be held at the Oak Forest and O’Hare campuses on Saturday, February 26 at 12 noon.  The workshop will take place at Naperville on Saturday, March 5th at noon.  During the workshop, you’ll explore strategies that can help you tackle long-term research projects, whether you’re working on an Independent Learning Pursuit, a senior thesis, an Advanced Project, or a course-long research paper.  (more…)

 

Digital humanities, the next big thing? November 16, 2010

An article in today’s New York Times discusses what might be the next big thing in the humanities. With texts being digitally scanned and uploaded every day (Google so far has scanned over 12 million books in over 40 languages), scholars in the humanities are able to use computational research methodologies in order to describe, analyze, and interpret vast swaths of text.  (more…)

 

Get your research published… on Wikipedia November 9, 2010

According to N.P.R., Wikipedia’s Public Policy Initiative has recruited professors from eight different universities (including Harvard and U.C. Berkeley) to incorporate Wikipedia into their courses on public policy. No, students will not be citing sources from Wikipedia. Rather, their research will be used to improve and  expand Wikipedia’s entries concerning public policy. (more…)

 

 
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