UCWbLing

writing. thinking. collaborating. teaching. learning. blogging…

UCWbLing is moving to a new home October 22, 2012

Filed under: cool & interesting events — Mark Jacobs @ 16:06 pm

Since we started UCWbLing in 2010, it has outgrown our expectations for what a writing program blog could accomplish.  With over 20,000 hits so far, we’re confident that this is one of the most active writing program blogs out there–yet UCWbLing is still run by tutors, for tutors.  To increase our capacity, we’re moving UCWbLing to a new home.  Continue following the latest from the UCWbL’s peer writing tutors at our new address:

UCWbLing.chicagolandwritingcenters.org

 

One Step At A Time September 26, 2013

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Good morning, UCWbLers and other writing-loving friends! Now that the autumn quarter is in full swing, we asked one of our new UCWbL writing tutors and graduate assistants, Marcela D., to write a little about her experience so far with the UCWbL!

First I was afraid, I was petrified, I thought I’d never understand what the UCWbL’s all about, the amount of things that it involves and how many people it helps through such different paths.

It was an overwhelming and full of excitement beginning indeed. I have never been a tutor, until now, except for teaching my daughter, which I never considered as a tutoring task but one of my maternal duties, so you can imagine how I felt as I began to dive into the UCWbL’s mission and believes.

Thankfully, now that I have been able to see below the surface and start to put into practice all the things we’ve been studying and reading, my fears are changing into joy, not only because I finally understood it, but also because it is an amazing experience to collaborate and work together with all kinds of writers in all kinds of writing projects.

One of the things I’m very happy about is the continued learning opportunity this represents, not only for writers, but also for tutors. Each meeting is a collaborative job between both of them, where an interchange of knowledge takes place.

The fact that the tutoring sessions are held in such a friendly environment helps the writers feel comfortable and open to suggestions, but at the same time invites them to come up with their own conclusions and, therefore, leads them to trust their writing process.

At the same time, the tutor learns that every writer is different, although most of their concerns might be the same, and this will improve its teaching skills as he would have to find the best way to reach out for each particular writer so they both find the path to improve not only the writing task in front of them, but the writer skills too.

Over these couple of weeks as a new UCWbLer I have found myself submerged in a lot of information and I can say that I’m very impressed about how well organized and practical everything is, but I’m even more impressed about all the good nature people I have found. It’s not easy to find people willing to guide you in every step of the road and even wait for you while you tie your shoes or need to make a pause to take some air.

 

Welcome Back! September 19, 2013

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The UCWbL is BACK!

It’s a new quarter at DePaul, and we just wanted to take a moment and remind you of a few items as we start getting ramped up for autumn!

-Appointments at the UCWbL are for everyone! Whether you are working on a resume, a poem, a research paper, or anything in between, the UCWbL wants to help you with any kind of writing you have.
-Appointments at the UCWbL aren’t just for struggling writers. We are happy to help even writers who feel confident in their work. It always helps to get another pair of eyes on a piece!
-Appointments at the UCWbL are for creative writers too! Believe me, there are so many people here who would love to get their hands on a poem, short story, or memoir!
-Get involved at the UCWbL! There are so many great opportunities for everyone at the UCWbL. Join a writing group, attend a Walk and Talk with the collaborative for multilingual writing and research, and check out Scrawl Radio every Friday starting next week! Really, that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

If you have any questions about the UCWbL please visit depaul.edu/writing or leave a comment here! If you’re new, welcome to DePaul, and if you’re coming back, we are glad to see you again. You look great today, everyone.

 

“Does poetry need paper?”: Writing Advice from Don DeLillo October 19, 2012

This week, the Chicago Public Library Foundation awarded novelist Don DeLillo the Carl Sandburg Literary Award, and to mark the occasion, DeLillo appeared at the downtown Harold Washington Library last night to read and discuss his latest work, The Angel Esmeralda, a collection of short stories.  It was an illuminating discussion.  Donna Seaman, the moderator, asked DeLillo about his influences and themes, but there were also many insights into DeLillo’s process as a writer. (more…)

 

More Banned Books Week Reflections: Ban Book Banning

Filed under: what do you think? — DePaul UCWbL @ 09:00 am
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The first week of October is one of my favorites. I love the coming of fall, Halloween, and pumpkin spice lattes at Starbucks. I also love the idea of an entire week dedicated to celebrating reading–and not just any reading, but the reading of banned books. I’ve never been much of a rebel, but this week is definitely one that even makes me want to break the rules. (more…)

 

Reading, Writing, FUN! October 18, 2012

Filed under: what do you think? — allegrapusateri @ 21:58 pm

Ever since I was little I have loved to read. Books were my television. I would imagine myself as one of the characters in the book, or sometimes I would make up a new character. Often times I would change the actions different characters would take, sometimes I would even change the ending of the story. Books allowed me to escape into a creative part of my mind that did not otherwise exist.

(more…)

 

わたし

The above, which reads ‘watashi,’ means simply “I.” It took my colleague and I two weeks to appreciate this, and we have far from mastered its use. This, of course, is only “I” as expressed in Hiragana, one of Japan’s three written alphabets (the other two being Katakana and Kanji). But that is just the beginning. ‘Watashi’ is only one (gender neutral) way of referring to oneself. ‘Watakushi’ is a more formal (even arrogant) variation; ‘boku’ is a polite masculine form, ‘ore’ an aggressive masculine form (for tough guys). But it doesn’t stop there; atashi, uchi, kochira, ware, wagahai, oira, shessha, atai, yo, and warawa are all distinct ways of expressing “I” in Japanese, each with their own connotations and proper context.

As you can imagine, all of these possibilities leave my colleague and I asking: “Who am I?” Or, to relate it to our work at the UCWBL, who am I as a tutor, in the context of a multilingual partnership? (more…)

 

 
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